Toward a History of Geomancy

[Edited gently for clarity January 2017]
There are two major contenders for the source of the geomancy’s dispersion in the last couple of millenia: West Africa or the Middle East. It is quite possible that neither are the final origin, that a still older cultural substratum pre-exists both. What we can say about that older substratum, if it exists, will nonetheless require us to pass through its more recent points of transmission.

Continue reading “Toward a History of Geomancy”

Dumuzi

Dreams of Dumuzi have been pushing me into the new year. The sorts of dreams that are full, buzzing with strange images and scenes that are difficult to remember, in part because they all seem to be the foreword wave ahead of something bigger. The dreams are all over the place, but behind them is a name and heavy presence: Dumuzi.

Continue reading “Dumuzi”

[NB] Assyria, Derrida, and a Language of the Earth

O radiance of the great gods, light of the earth
Illuminator of the world regions
Lofty judge, creator of heaven and earth
O Shamash, by your light you scan the totality of lands as if they were cuneiform signs
You never weary of divination.
—hymn from the reign of Ashurbanipal, qtd. by Derrida in of Grammatology, qtd. by Zainab Bahrani in Rituals of War (61)

I take an especial pleasure in this citation, the way this text joins other texts, like a needle and thread cinching together fabrics.

Continue reading “[NB] Assyria, Derrida, and a Language of the Earth”

[NB] Mythology 101: There is Never Just One Story

I am pretty sure that I have said this before, but it bears repeating. Anytime you are looking at one account of a myth, you have to assume that there are other accounts that tell the myth in a different fashion, some so different that they would likely offend the sensibilities that made one myth appealing to you. The entanglement of all those accounts defines the myth-mystery, so that a myth is inevitably polymorphous.

Continue reading “[NB] Mythology 101: There is Never Just One Story”

[NB] Women in the Sumerian Deadlands

Just a couple quotes. These relate to two earlier posts, one on the Sumerian diasporas and their legacy in occult thought and another discussing the way in which this material has helped illumine my own spiritual experience.

These are both from Dina Katz’s The Image of the Netherworld in Sumerian Sources. I have made some changes to her transliteration of names to avoid using special characters.

Continue reading “[NB] Women in the Sumerian Deadlands”

Hod X Netzach

Today has been one of those days that has brimmed over with synchronicities surrounding my spiritual work. I’m still a touch punchy and this post may follow suit. Be kind. Hopefully, it will become more clear over time as I dwell upon its contents. Some of this only makes sense if you follow the links.

Do you ever feel the urge to say something and then discover a message for yourself from spirit within it? Of course you have; it’s just the spiritual side of the Freudian slip. So, in response to Gordon’s post about neotheosophy I caught clear sight of the relationship between Hod and sattva. Despite the fact that we put Hod on the pillar of severity, it has profound ties to the pillar of mercy, in a way that mirrors the ties between Netzach and the pillar of severity.

Continue reading “Hod X Netzach”

To Know Home, Not Go Home

The story of Adam Kadmon always sits up against the story of the dismembered giant that pervades the Indo-European mythologies. In the case of Adam Kadmon, you have this figure in the mind of God that serves as the blueprint for the work of creation. Adam the created, the Adam of the Garden, clearly partakes of this figure’s nature in some way, too, for while he does not possess the force of Adam Kadmon to create, he still possesses the names of things which activates those forces. The dismembered giant, by contrast, tends to be a monster or tyrant who must be destroyed and broken apart to provide the material for the created world.

Continue reading “To Know Home, Not Go Home”