Geomantic Resh (Mercury, Wednesday, Left Ear)

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Geomantic albus.svg          Geomantic rubeus.svg

Within the planetary circuit, Resh follows Pe and precedes Kaf. In the sequence of the week, it follows Dalet and precedes Gimel. Upon the plane of orifices that constitute the face, Resh fashions the ears along with Pe. Within the Tree of Life, it is the bottom double upon the pillar of severity, crowned with Gevurah and resting upon Hod. In all of these assemblages, it finds expression through the geomantic figures of Albus and Rubeus.

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[NB] MBTI / Geomancy

I have had this on the back burner for a while, so in the new year spirit of cleaning out the old, here you go.

Stacey pointed out to me this article which maps the MBTI types to the sixteen geomantic figures. I have considered making a similar effort before but come at it from a much different direction. Rather than attempt to map any sort of one-to-one figure to type correspondence, I have tried to map each type onto two figures, an ‘introverted’ figure and an ‘extroverted’ figure.

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Mercurial Matters

My final, somewhat off-the-cuff, post on the thoughts stirred up by Gordon’s review, this time regarding Mercury. More from the-book-I-haven’t-read here used as writing prompt, Epoch:

Mercury’s patronage of doctors…may seem a little odd, but until recently most medicine consisted almost entirely of charlatanism, quackery, placebos, convoluted explanations and excuses, huge bills and rapid exits. A fair bit of it stil does, both in its conventional and alternative modes.

The connections between Mercury and opportunism of all sorts is real enough, but this way of connecting them to medicine over-emphasizes them. There is a lot more than opportunism and trickery to Mercury. Digging into the quote just a little, there are two points I want to address: one is a matter of tone, the other of substance.

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Noodling over Divination

Tim Powers writes a lot of fiction about magical topics but is himself a conservatively religious sort of guy. I quite respect that sort of attitude–cautious awareness of the wider spiritual world joined to a serious respect for the very humane spiritual traditions that have traditionally been kind to people qua people. Anyway, I quite like the way he portrays Tarot in his book Last Call (which seems to mirror his own personal distrust of Tarot): when you spread out the cards, the spirit world has a chance to look at you. It is something of a one-way mirror, so that while you see in the reading yourself and your situation, the spirits see you. Like a one-way mirror, you can’t always tell if there is someone on the other side, but there might be.

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